The Best Password Manager For Your Business

best password manager

The best password manager, in our opinion, is LastPass. Desktop and mobile support, password sharing, file storage, family management, dark web monitoring, a password generator, and more are all included. Due to a solid balance of free and premium features, it feels more complete overall.

Related
Small Business Problems Five And How To Overcome Them
Why Working Capital Loan is Important for Small Business
5 Ways to Increase The Value of Your Business 
Types of Small Business Financing Strategies

What features should a password manager have?

The issue with looking for the best password manager is that they aren’t all that different. They all save your login information, require a master password, generate new passwords, and have an autofill feature so you don’t have to type in a long string of letters, numbers, and characters.

In general, the best password manager should create long, unique passwords that are nearly tough to guess. Because passwords are frequently reused, too short, and readily guessed, it’s important for day-to-day use across all accounts.

You should also look for a password manager that works on a variety of platforms, such as Windows, macOS, Android, and iOS. Choose a password manager that is still being developed and, if possible, supports end-to-end encryption.

Finally, a password manager’s product page should include the phrase “zero-knowledge.” That implies the app’s creator doesn’t have access to your information. If a password manager advertises device synchronization (which most do), the data should be stored as an inaccessible encrypted blob on the developer’s cloud servers.

Jump forward to our expanded section below for a more in-depth look at the key features to look for in a password manager.

Best overall: LastPass

Pricing

Free
Premium: $36/yr.
Families: $48/yr.

Features

Password generator
Password autofill
Secure vault
Password sharing
Encrypted notes
Two-factor authentication

Availability

Desktop: Windows, macOS, Linux
Browser extensions: Chrome, Edge, Firefox, Opera, Safari
Mobile: Android, iOS, iPadOS

Pros:

Unlimited Password Storage
Password Sharing

Cons:

No Monthly payment Option
Only one device supported on the free version

LastPass is a fantastic password manager for saving everything you need, from usernames and passwords to addresses and credit cards.

Unlimited passwords, password sharing with a friend or family member, two-factor authentication, a password generator, and password autofill are all included in the free edition.

The free service, on the other hand, restricts users to one device type—a computer or a mobile device, but not both. Users can go back and forth between the two device categories three times.

The Premium and Family plan, of course, removes the restrictions on device types. The Premium package includes 1GB of cloud storage, dark web monitoring, fingerprint and YubiKey support, a security dashboard, and the ability to share passwords with multiple friends or family members to a single user.

The Family Plan is for six people and adds unlimited shared folders and family administration to the Premium plan.

Best for iOS and macOS: 1Password

Pricing

Single user: $36/yr.
Families: $60/yr.

Features

Unlimited devices
Unlimited passwords
Password generator
Custom vaults
365-day password retrieval
Password sharing

Availability

Desktop: Windows, macOS, Linux
Browser extensions: Chrome, Firefox, Edge, Brave
Mobile: Android, iOS, iPadOS
Command-line options

Pros:

Supports Face ID
Allows you to create share custom vaults

Cons:

No Free Version
No Safari extension

1Password launched in June 2006 and shares many of the same features as LastPass.

1Password, like its competition, allows you to save login credentials as well as other sensitive information such as credit cards. Because there is no free edition, you have access to premium features right away. These features include 1GB of storage, support for an unlimited number of devices, technical assistance, and a Travel Mode that eliminates data from your devices momentarily when traveling to foreign countries.

The Family plan expands on the Personal plan by providing assistance to up to five people. Without the need for separate subscriptions, users can configure rights and build vaults for each individual. Users can retrieve deleted or altered passwords up to a year before the current date using item history backup.

Additional individuals can be added to the Family plan for $1 per month per person.

Best for usability: Dashlane

Pricing

Free
Premium: $60/yr.
Family: $90/yr.

Features

Password sharing
Two-factor authentication
Dark web monitoring
Built-in VPN
Autofill
Unlimited passwords and devices on Premium plans

Availability

Desktop: Windows, macOS, Linux
Browser extensions: Chrome, Chromium browsers, Firefox, Safari
Mobile: Android, iOS, iPadOS

Pros:

Monthly Plans
Build-in VPN (Premium)

Cons:

Storage for only 50 passwords on the free plan
High price for families

Dashlane is a password manager that has been around since 2012. It offers password storage, form and payment autofill, two-factor authentication, password generation, a digital wallet, and other features similar to the other password managers on our list.

Users are limited to one device and 50 passwords in the free version. All new accounts, on the other hand, come with a 30-day Premium membership trial, which gives users access to limitless passwords and devices. The Premium version unlocks the built-in VPN feature and adds dark web surveillance to secure your data from eavesdroppers as it travels along the internet highways.

Users can add up to five more people to their Family package. You can create a private account for each member and manage them all from the dashboard, along with the billing. This package costs $90 per year, but you can pay $9 per month in installments (unlike the other password managers on our list). The Premium plan is the same: $60 per year or $6.50 per month.

Password manager features

Password managers all offer the same basic functions. We’ll go over some of these fundamentals in further detail below so you can see why they’re vital.

Can Generate Password

While having a password vault is beneficial, many of those passwords are likely to be reused across services, are too readily guessed, or were discovered as part of a data breach. A password generator is necessary because it can generate a secure, random password from nothing. It’s just a bunch of letters, numbers, and symbols that have nothing to do with your favorite pet or television show.

The iPhone, iPad, and Android, of course, will generate a password for you. Using a password manager with a universal password generator, on the other hand, allows you to rapidly apply new passwords across all devices.

Password Sharing

If you plan to share account credentials, item sharing is a must-have tool. A streaming service like Netflix or Disney+, for example, is a fantastic example of where someone inside or outside the family desires access to the service. Item sharing isn’t limited to passwords: you may share notes, credit cards, and other personal information that you don’t want to send over the internet.

Dark Web Monitoring

The dark web is a section of the internet that can only be accessed through certain web browsers. Because these sites aren’t indexed by search engines, you won’t be able to find them using regular browsers like Chrome or Safari. It’s an area where people can do things that aren’t visible to the public (the open web).

This isn’t to say that these actions are always bad, but stolen user credentials are frequently broadcasted, sold, and bought on the dark web. The monitoring mechanism looks for information on end-users on these websites, such as email addresses, passwords, credit card numbers, and so on.

Cloud Storage

There are two elements to consider with this feature. First, using cloud storage, data is synchronized across devices. This data isn’t accessible to developers; it’s just an encrypted blob that’s posted and downloaded as needed.

Sticky Password offers a Wi-Fi option, and Bitwarden has a tool for creating a local service, as illustrated above. Regardless of whether the data is stored locally or in the cloud, uploading and downloading data is required for multidevice synchronization.

Second, premium services sometimes include generic online storage for storing sensitive documents and sending them as encrypted attachments. Tax forms, scanned personal ID cards (such as your driver’s license), a Social Security card, a passport, and other documents are examples.

This isn’t to say that these actions are always bad, but stolen user credentials are frequently broadcasted, sold, and bought on the dark web. The monitoring mechanism looks for information on end-users on these websites, such as email addresses, passwords, credit card numbers, and so on.

Emergency access

It’s beneficial to be able to provide someone access to your password management account. You created and maintained accounts for Netflix, Hulu, Disney+, HBO Max, and other services, for example. However, your significant other is unable to use these services, and you are confined to a hospital bed and unable to offer login credentials. If you give someone access to your password manager, they can sign in and get the login credentials for these services.

For example, using LastPass, you can grant access to your password manager to a single person. Meanwhile, 1Password includes a feature that allows you to produce a PDF with the master password hidden inside.

This isn’t to say that these actions are always bad, but stolen user credentials are frequently broadcasted, sold, and bought on the dark web. The monitoring mechanism looks for information on end-users on these websites, such as email addresses, passwords, credit card numbers, and so on.

Conclusion:

Even though developer LogMeIn ended multidevice synchronization in the free version, LastPass has remained our favorite password manager for quite some time.

Overall, LastPass is a good free password organizer, but the subscription versions are considerably better, with cloud storage, multidevice compatibility, dark web monitoring, and emergency access.

Still, you can’t go wrong with any of the password managers we recommend. Simply measure your particular requirements against your budget. Stick with Bitwarden if you want a free client. LastPass is the best option if you don’t mind paying an annual fee, however, 1Password is a close second.